Did You Know?

Jaguar E Type (XKE) Production Figures
Total Number of E-Types Built
72530 including 12330 for U.K.
Jaguar Series 1 3.8 E-Type 1961-1964
Chassis No.       Quantities produced (to nearest 10)
Open Right Hand Drive 850001 Onwards 7820 including 760 for U.K.
Open Left Hand Drive 875001 Onwards 7820 including 760 for U.K.
FHC Right Hand Drive 860001 Onwards 7670 including 1560 for U.K.
FHC Left Hand Drive 885001 Onwards 7670 including 1560 for U.K.
Engine No
R1001 onwards
Jaguar Series 1 4.2 E-Type 1965-1968
Chassis No.       Quantities produced (to nearest 10)
Open Right Hand Drive IE 1001 Onwards 9550 including 1050 for U.K.
Open Left Hand Drive IE 10001 Onwards 9550 including 1050 for U.K.
FHC Right Hand Drive IE 20001 Onwards 7770 including 1700 for U.K.
FHC Left Hand Drive IE 30001 Onwards 7770 including 1700 for U.K.
Engine No
7E 1001 onwards
Jaguar Series 1 4.2 2+2 E-Type 1965-1968
Chassis No.       Quantities produced (to nearest 10)
Open Right Hand Drive IE 50001 Onwards 5600 including 1220 for U.K.
Open Left Hand Drive IE 75001 Onwards 5600 including 1220 for U.K.
Engine No
7E 50001 onwards
Jaguar Series 2 4.2 E-Type 1969-1970
Chassis No.       Quantities produced (to nearest 10)
Open Right Hand Drive IR 1001 Onwards 8630 including 690 for U.K.
Open Left Hand Drive IR 7001 Onwards 8630 including 690 for U.K.
FHC Right Hand Drive IR 20001 Onwards 4860 including 910 for U.K.
FHC Left Hand Drive IR 25001 Onwards 4860 including 910 for U.K.
2+2 Right Hand Drive IR 35001 Onwards 5330 including 870 for U.K.
2+2 Left Hand Drive IR 40001 Onwards 5330 including 870 for U.K.
Engine No
7R 1001 onwards 2+2 7R 35001
Jaguar Series 3 5.3 E-Type 1971-1975
Chassis No.       Quantities produced (to nearest 10)
Open Right Hand Drive IS 1001 Onwards 7990 including 1740 for U.K.
Open Left Hand Drive IS 20001 Onwards 7990 including 1740 for U.K.
FHC Right Hand Drive IS 50001 Onwards 7300 including 1830 for U.K.
FHC Left Hand Drive IS 70001 Onwards 7300 including 1830 for U.K.


April 2005- JAGUAR PART NUMBER APPLICATION IN RELATION TO THE SIZE AND TYPE OF BOLT - SETSCREW


Post XK models pre British Leyland era. Early middle 1960's

For Example:
Part number: UFB 131 - 16R
UF = Unified Thread
B = Bolt
1 = No technical meaning known
31 = .31 of an inch in decimal terms or 5/16 in fraction being the diameter of the bolt shank
16 = 16 x 1/8 of an inch being 2 inches the length of the bolt shank

By replacing the 'B' to a 'S' being UFS this would determine a setscrew NOT bolt i.e. with thread the entire length of the Shank

And

UCB means Unified Coarse Bolt UCS means Unified Coarse Set Screw Fine and Coarse is the pitch of the thread (TPI) Threads per inch

The previously illustrated part number used as an example could be superseded by a new part number without the part changing under the British Leyland Standard LG5.06.01 December 1969

For Example:

Part number: BH 605161/J


B = Bolt
H = Hexagonal
6 = UNF thread
05 = 5/16 of an inch being the diameter of the bolts shank
16 = 16 x 1/8 of an inch being 2" the length of the bolt shank

When the bolt is replaced by SH it means it would be a set screw. By replacing the 6 to a 5 it would determine that it is a coarse thread UCS.

Similar applies with nuts:

UFN = Unified Fine Thread
UCN = UCN Unified Coarse Thread

The same workings apply as a bolt or set screw.

This document was prepared for information and historical use only.

Any reliance on or use of this information is entirely at the recipients risk.

Martin Robey Engineering Limited 2005 ©

 


April 2005- BRITISH LEYLAND FASTENERS CODING SYSTEM
Any reliance on or use of this information is entirely at the recipients risk. This document was prepared for information and historical use only.  


Identifying letters
As far as possible, these describe the part e.g. NH is nut, hexagon, BH is bolt,hexagon. Where appropriate, these identifying letters are also related to the material grades employed by the individual components they represent. See Appendix A for further details in this respect.

First digit
This denotes the Thread Series as below 1 ISO Metric Coarse Pitch 2 ISO Metric Fine Pitch 3 Whitworth thread 4 BSG thread 5 Unified Coarse thread 6 Unified fine thread 7 BA thread 8 American Numbered Coarse thread 9 American Numbered Fine thread The first digit applications for non-threaded fasteners and other particular types of fastener component are detailed separately in LGS.06.07 and LGS.08 etc. Note For combination thread studs, the metal end thread series of the stud shall be the basis of coding for the first digit.

Second and third digits
These usually indicate the nominal diameter of the part, in millimeters if the part is metric in % in if the part is an inch thread form, and if the part has a numbered diameter, they indicate the number directly, e.g. 12mm is represented by 12. 1in by 16 4BA by 04. The second and third digit applications for non-threaded fasteners and other particular types of fastener component are detailed separately in LGS.06.07 and LGS.06.08 etc.

Fourth and fifth digits
These usually indicate the nominal length of the component as indicated below. These nominal length increments of coding for the various types of fastener have been carefully selected to give the maximum coverage possible within a logical coded system although it must be appreciated that this imposes certain limitations. For example metric screws greater than 99mm long cannot be coded, nor can short metric studs or bolts which have nominal lengths which are not in exact 5mm increments. Should such components be required in these sizes it is recommended that they be added to existing individual company stock lists until they can be included in a common Group part numbering system for miscellaneous standard parts.

Bolts
In this instance, the digits indicate the nominal length of the component, in 5mm increments if it is a metric fastener, 1/8in increments if it is an inch size fastener 1/32 in increments for BA and America Numbered Thread Series fasteners.

Scews
In this instance, the digits indicate the nominal length of the component, in 1mm increments if it is a metric fastener, 1/8in in increments if it is an inch size fastener 1/32 in increments for BA and American Numbered Thread Series Fasteners.

Studs
In this instance, the digits indicate the nominal length (see note below) of the component, in 5mm increments if it is a metric fastener, 1/8in increments if it is an inch size fastener, 1/32in increments for BA and American Numbered Thread Series fasteners. Note: For Unified studs the nominal length shall be the overall length as laid down in BS2693. For Metric studs the nominal length shall be the standout length as laid down in ISO R/225 and in BS4439.

Nuts
The fourth digit represents the basic type of material (steel, brass, etc.) and the fifth digit indicates the various grades or other classifications (e.g. tensile strength) of these individual materials. See also Clause 3 of Appendix A.In certain instances where this nut material code cannot be satisfactorily applied (e.g. for piercenuts where one common thread diameter may be used with varying external dimensional features) the alternative coding is given on the individual part number sheet.

Fourth digit
This represents the basic type of material as given below:
0-Steel
1-Brass
2-
3-
4-
5-
6-
7-
8-
9-

Fifth digit
This represents the respective grade or other classification of the individual basic materials as laid down in the following clauses.

Steel Nuts (having a fourth digit of 0)
For steel nuts the fifth digit code given below in Table 1 comprises an 'equivalent material' grading system which is formulated so as to provide one basic set of fifth digits to cater for the existing standard grades of steel for nuts in the various recodnised standard thread series. It is based primarily on the metric grading system outlined for nuts in BS3692 ('ISO Metric precision hexagon bolts, screws and nuts') as this should in time form the ultimate grading system for steel nuts

Notes:
1. The fifth digits 1,4 and 6 (see tables 1 and 2) apply to nuts which are normally used in conjunction with the following types of fasteners.
Fifth digit 1 - low tensile fasteners such as machine screws and other small low tensile bolts such as BA and American Numbered types.
Fifth digit 4 - medium tensile (precision) fasteners. The majority of nuts currently used fall within this category.
Fifth digit 6 - high tensile fasteners for use in special design applications.
2. For further more detailed information regarding the various grades of ruts, the respective BS specification should be consulted.



March 2005- SUGGESTED GUIDELINES FOR FITTING NEW DOOR SKINS FOR AN E TYPE JAGUAR


Before starting ensure that protective clothing is worn along with eye protection and ensure safety guards on any equipment are used. These methods are offered as guide lines for professional engineers or experienced amaturs.

Always refer to the manufacturers instructions on all equipment used. Always refer to the vehicles workshop manual.


Preliminary Checks

Before purchasing a new door skin it should be established that a door skin alone will suffice and the door inner shell (main structure of the door) does not require major repair work itself which if so it would probably then be more effective to fit a new door.

Considering the lengths that the 'Skilled Bodger' will go to avoid fitting new parts great care should be taken to clean back the flanges, and rust prone areas of a door which appears sound but seem's somehow different especially where the flanges of the skin are clenched over the Frame, susually thicker with a filled area where the edge of the flange is normally visible. (See Fig.1) if this is the case a thorough examination is required. When removing paint, lead, filler etc from these areas it is best to use a little paint stripper which will let you see exactly whjat you are dealing with and allow you to select the appropriate removal technique or even reveal damage so bad as not to even waste time messing with it further. An hour or so doing these checks can save many house travelling and money wasted in returning the door skin for a complete door etc., and avoid any unnecessary delay to repairs.


ASSESSMENT OF PRESENT FIT

As these guide-lines are presuming repairs are isolated to the door only i shall avoid drifting off into what could end as a book on restoring the complete Body Shell but certain areas should be looked into before removal of the door, the door skin, chrome and interior trim parts.

Ensure the rubber weather seals, window frame Sill Chrome etc are fitted correctly without unattached sections bulging out. SEt the door to ontain the best possible fit all round and set the lock striker assembly.

Then area by area check the fit and gap between Frame to Screen Pillar, forward edge of door to Bulkhead Side Panels, lower edge to sill, Rear Edge to Rear Wing and Top Edge Rear to Hood or Side Pillar Strut. This may show that the Sill, Rear Wing etc., are fitted porrly make a quick sketch pointing out the problems (or a Photograph) for later reference if needed.

Removal of Door Skin

Presuming no major defects prevent the continuation of the fitting of the new door skin the door should be removed and stripped.

The position of the hinge and striker can be marked with a felt tip pen for future reference around their outside face before removal.

When removing the door skin two main objectives should be in mind, being, the removal of the skin with the minimum damage to the door inner and oneself, and many find this extremely difficult which makes all subsequent work even more complicated.

The door skin is held in position by three methods, (a) Clenched Flange. (b) Spot Welded (c) Gas Welded or Brazed.

You should have a Hand Drill with an 8mm (approx) Trapaning bit if not available sharpen a traditional bit as leasted ponted as possible, as you only want to drill through the door skin and no into the inner. A hacksaw, pair of plierws and a hand held sander or grindett fitted with a new flexy disc or a hard disc.

To keep these guide-lines short I shall attempt to avoid the ovious but ensure the normal safety precautions are taken with regard to this equipment and be certain to clamp the door firmly to a workbench during the following stages. By removing the paint locate the spot wleds joining the skin to the frame, normally six, two at the front edge at the rear edge and one at each corner on the lower edge of the door, Fig.2. Drill threough the outer skin at the center of the spot weld without penetrating or damaging the inner frame flange or tabs inside the vertical top sections. Using the hand grinder held at 90 degrees to the face of the skin cur through the outer skin by 95% approx this will be indicated by a blue line appearing when almost through. Fig. 3 & 4. Work firmly, smoothly carefully watching for evidence of separation, the skin may even separate by existing stress acting.




Using a hacksaw cut through the skin about 3mm from the Flange or Tabs at the front and rear of top vertical faces of the door skin. Fig.5.

Carefully remove the skin regrinding or drilling to relieve areas still attached, when the skin is away from the inner using the grinder or likewise remove and surplus pieces of door skin remaining.

Examine the outside area of the door frame for damage or irregularity of curvature and remedy carefully.

Carry out further cleaning and fit the door window freame using shims etc., as disassembled, fit the door inner to the car as if a skin were attached.Carefully set and adjusting for any changes in the contours of the door inner relatation to the adjacent body panels, shims can be used to help align, note the gaps between the frame and the body panels and assemble accordingly. There is usually an amount of movement permissible between door shell inside the skin flanges which you may need equally distributed or biased to obtain the best position. WHen originally assembled the relationship would be fixed by assembly jigs but by hand care must be taken. The bottom gap between door inner and the skin flange should be parallel. Fig.6.


Before fitting the inner and skin together the skin should be offered to the body and shims of about 5-6mm should be uised to check the skin to door aperture the finished gap should be 3-5mm after lead loading and paintwork.

E Type Doors vary slightly mostly at the top forward edge the radius is sometimes smaller from car to car.

IF one can fit a new door or door skin without removing the lead from the body on the door aperture it is probably just luck as the body was lead loaded to suit the door and relative position at the time of manufacture.

When checking the fit of door skin, if it looks a bit tight (less than about 4mm) it is probably best to remove the lead and set up again.

Once the position of the door inner inside the skin is established the door skin should be laid face down on either a flat clean smooth steel table or a work bench with cardboard or carpet to protect it from damage, (before final assemblyu takes place any painting of the inside of the door frame and skin should take place also fit a sound deadening pad to the skin like the one on the original. Do not use any wax type chemicals at this stage because of the mess and problems with painting afterwards).

Fit the inner inside the skin and position as required by using small G clamps or weld grip clamps, position the clamps as close to the horizontal crease line as possible at the front and rear edge ensuring that no excess material is trapped between the clamp positions. Fig. 7. Check alignment again and if O.K. proceed to clench the flange over (preferably first spot weld the skin to the inner shell where cramped at the top of the door). To protect the door skin from damage use a strip of metal or wood under the clamp on the skin face.


Start to clench over the flange a little at a time do not finish in one place and only a few inches away not started, work progressively using a small faced hammer with a slight curve on its face, too flat a hammer will leave marks. Fig.8. Work away from the clamps and do not plannish down completely at this stage. When it is completely clenched align th top section and spot or gas weld as required.

Fit the door locks, window and frame and fit the door to car. As assembly jigs have not been used it will need to be set by twisting diagonally in most cases, when the door is set either spot weld or braze the rear lower corner skin to door inner that will trap the 'set', then repeat at the front coerner after checking again, (be very careful not to distort the door skin by over heating during welding etc.) remove door and clench the flange down firmly without excessive force. Now turn the door over so the skin is face up, using both a flat hand weight (Dolly) and curved one with a spoon or flapper, even out any local distortion, Fig.9. Check the bottom edge with a straight edge and rectify if needed.

Using a body file, file up to flanged portion of the door skin to highlight any low spots and pick up same and file smooth, keep the filling parallel with the edge. Fig.10.

Before painting ensure the door, door frame, locks, rubber seals, mirror etc., are fitted correctly and any holes drilled for trim or chromes etc., this dummy run will save rectification after painting and can be used in conjunction with any alterations to the leaded area of the body to match door profile needed.

Please note this was orignally written to use in conjunction with a live demonstration we carried out and for reference later.

MARTIN ROBEY ENGINEERING LTD ©